In Western Province and Griquas Sunday’s SuperSport Rugby Challenge final (at the Florida Park Sports Grounds in Ravensmead, Cape Town) features two distinct teams who have one common feature.

While one is unbeaten (Province) and the other is a surprise finalist, the one thing they share is that they’ve proven to be particularly difficult to beat.

We got two coaches whose sides have played against the two teams to tell us what makes them tick.

RYNHARDT VAN AS (SWD EAGLES) ON WESTERN PROVINCE

What is their playing pattern, how do they try to hurt you in a game?

What’s quite dangerous from them is that they’re quite strong at the set piece in that they get penalties in the scrums and they’re well structured from the lineouts. They’re well structured and that’s why they’ll always try to see if they can get the set piece right so they can get play started and get over the advantage line with their strike runners.

Who are the key players in implementing that playing pattern?

I think for them it’s the tight five. They rely on them to give them proper ball and help sort out their set piece. The back three (Craig Barry, Marcello Sampson and Bjorn Basson) are also dangerous, especially on the counter. If you need to kick you need a proper exit plan to neutralise them.

How do you stop them?

You have to minimise your mistakes, keep ball and not give them any turnover ball to counter attack. If you can sort out their set piece and win yours you have a chance.

What’s their Plan B when you block their initial plan?

They’ve got good experienced guys in the team. What also helps them is that as a squad they always train against the Super Rugby squad. So they are more patient and for a Plan B they rely on those Super Rugby guys’ experience to calm them down.

What’s the one thing you mustn't do against them?

You mustn’t give them turnover ball. If you can minimise those you’ve got a chance. You must also stop their momentum in defence, and the most important thing there is you must make your one on one tackles and stop them getting the half-gaps for the offloads.

BAFAN NHLEKO (GOLDEN LIONS) ON GRIQUAS

What is their playing pattern, how do they try to hurt you in a game?

They mix up their attack well in terms of winning the physical contest up front through carries or pick and gos, then they come hard with their running backs. Even when they keep it up front, their backs are disciplined in keeping their width. Your defence always has to be alert, work hard and be disciplined in keeping its shape.

Who are the key players in implementing that playing pattern?

Their set piece gave them reward against us, which allowed their spine (the hooker, the eighthman, the scrumhalf, the flyhalf and the inside centre) to come into alive. Those guys created most of the magic and the rest of the boys were clinical.

How do you stop them?

Don’t play like us... By that I mean don’t give away 19 turnovers in one half (we had no respect for possession) and after defending close to 15 phases one guy shoots out of the line to give away a try. You can stop them through your in contact skill and discipline in keeping your ball; not forcing play from your half because they capitalise on turnover ball; and dominating your own set piece and disrupting theirs.

What’s their Plan B when you block their initial plan?

They become a same-side team, which means your biggest challenge becomes dominant tackles and outworking them on the fold. Their flyhalves also kick well out of hand.

What’s the one thing you mustn't do against them?

You mustn’t energise them by giving them turnover ball. I believe if you stay in the fight early on in the game and up your tempo in the last 20 minutes you have a chance – but they are a good team, are well-organised and well-coached. They seem to care for each other so they fight well, too.